Last edited by Mezizil
Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

2 edition of Economic impact of radioactive waste disposal sites in Texas found in the catalog.

Economic impact of radioactive waste disposal sites in Texas

Jerome A. Olson

Economic impact of radioactive waste disposal sites in Texas

by Jerome A. Olson

  • 385 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published by The Authority in [Austin, Tex.] (1300-C E. Anderson Ln., Suite 175, Austin 78752) .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Texas.
    • Subjects:
    • Low level radioactive waste disposal facilities -- Economic aspects -- Texas.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementprepared by Jerry Olson and Susan Goodman (Bureau of Business Research, University of Texas at Austin) ; prepared for Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority.
      ContributionsGoodman, Susan, 1959-, University of Texas at Austin. Bureau of Business Research., Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsTD898 .O48 1984
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxii, 155 p. :
      Number of Pages155
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3003336M
      LC Control Number84622570

      A PDF is a digital representation of the print book, so while it can be loaded into most e-reader programs, it doesn't allow for resizable text or advanced, interactive functionality. The eBook is optimized for e-reader devices and apps, which means that it offers a much better digital reading experience than a PDF, including resizable text and. As suggested in Article III, Section , Paragraph 8 of the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact, I am pleased to provide the annual report of the Texas Low-Level Radioactive and to provide for and encourage the economic management and disposal of low-level radioactive waste.

      An overview of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in the petroleum industry. United States: N. p., Economic impact of potential NORM regulations. Cavern disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste, other than NORM waste, is occurring at four Texas facilities, in several Canadian facilities, and reportedly in Europe. In February , the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Swisher County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The potentially acceptable site was subsequently narrowed to an area of 9 square miles.

        Texas Company, Alone in U.S., Cashes In on Nuclear Waste. to establish low-level waste disposal sites, but the Texas site is the first and only one to .   Here's a ranking of how radioactive waste storage shakes out, from waste-free states to states with a lot of radioactive residue. Among the waste-free: Nevada. Yes, the Nevada Test Site was.


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Economic impact of radioactive waste disposal sites in Texas by Jerome A. Olson Download PDF EPUB FB2

The majority of storage space at the 1, acre site is designated for members of the Texas Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact Commission, which only includes Texas and Vermont.

The. Radioactive Waste Disposal: Tailings Impoundments List of the three conventional uranium mills or tailings impoundments in Texas, the operators, and the county where each is located. These sites are classified as disposal sites for by-product material.

Texas is a member of the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact with the state of Vermont. The compact allows exclusive disposal of the LLRW generated within the member states to be disposed of in a LLRW disposal facility constructed within any of those states.

Texas is the host state for the compact disposal facility. § - Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material; Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) TCEQ is responsible for licensing the Texas LLRW waste disposal facility under 30 Texas Administrative Code, Title ; "Radioactive Substance Rules".

Also see the Waste Generator Disposal Guide page on their website. aspects of the near surface disposal of radioactive waste. This report discusses the various socio-economic and other non-radiological impacts that could be associated with the near surface disposal of radioactive waste, and is intended to fill an existing gap in the IAEA’s publications in the area of the management of low and.

Operational since spring ofthe Texas Compact Waste Facility (CWF) is owned and licensed by the State of Texas, operated by Waste Control Specialists. The WCS facility in western Andrews County is the only commercial facility in the United States licensed to dispose of Class A, B and C Low-level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) in the past 40 years.

WCS provides a one-stop location for treatment, storage and disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) and mixed low-level radioactive waste. WCS provides vital disposal services at its Compact Waste Facility (CWF) for Texas generators of LLRW and generators in 34 other states that do not have an operating compact facility.

Download a PDF of "Social and Economic Aspects of Radioactive Waste Disposal" by the National Research Council for free. Download a PDF of "Social and Economic Aspects of Radioactive Waste Disposal" by the National Research Council for free. A PDF is a digital representation of the print book, so while it can be loaded into most e-reader.

Update, May 1, The Senate has passed SB The bill could allow states around the U.S. to import more of the “hotter” radioactive waste into a.

The safe management of nuclear and radioactive wastes is a subject that has recently received considerable recognition due to the huge volume of accumulative wastes and the increased public awareness of the hazards of these wastes. This book aims to cover the practice and research efforts that are currently conducted to deal with the technical difficulties in different radioactive.

FEDERAL STATUTE: PL The U.S. Congress ratified a Compact between Texas, Maine and Vermont for disposal of low-level radioactive waste with the passage of the Compact Consent Act, PL in STATE STATUTES: Texas Health And Safety Code. Chapter Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact.

Health And Safety Code. The objectives of the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority (TLLRWDA) were to update existing statutes governing radioactive materials and to establish a state-operated low-level radioactive waste disposal program. Records include correspondence, memorandums, environmental monitoring and experimental data, minutes and agenda, reports, studies, news.

(2) The policy and purpose of the Compact, as set out in Public Lawa federal law known as the "Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact Consent Act"; in THSC, §, the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact; and 10 V.S.A.

§, the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact; (3) The economic. Only Vermont had a deal to dispose of its nuclear waste in Texas, so Simmons began lobbying to amend the nearly year-old compact with the Green Mountain State to allow other states to also send Author: Josh Harkinson.

Historical Manuscripts Home Alphabetical List of All Collections | Collections Listed By Subject: Collection Title: Nuclear Waste Disposal Research Collection Collection Number: M Dates: ca. Volume: cu. Provenance: The collection was donated by Mrs.

Carolyn Blackman in August It was transferred to the Archives from the Mississippiana Collection by. The standards that radioactive waste disposal sites have to meet is to demonstrate that no one in the future will get a higher dose than a frequent flyer does today.

mSv is about equal to. Texas is trying to take the federal government to task for failing to find a permanent disposal site for thousands of metric tons of radioactive waste piling up at nuclear reactor sites across the. “low-level” radioactive waste can have very long -lasting components (some literally millions of years hazardous) while the federal regulations only require years of institutional control (see 10 CFR ).

Only 7 commercial “low-level” radioactive waste disposal facilities have operated in the U.S., 3 of which arestill open Size: 54KB. "Low-level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority Act: ChapterActs of the 67th Legislature of the state of Texas, Regular session, Article f-1, Vernon's Texas civil statutes.

"Austin: Texas Low-level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority, The volume of low-level waste increased during the initial years (–80) of commercially generated waste disposal; this, coupled with the threatened closing of the South Carolina site, prompted Congress to pass the Low Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of (PL ), calling for the establishment of a national system of such.

Look to Texas Rather Than Nevada for a Site Selection Process on Nuclear Waste Disposal Federation of American Scientists | Public Interest Report | Winter – Volume 68 Number 1 Anywhere: Politics, Social Movements and the Disposal of Low-level Radioactive Waste, Resources for the Future Press.

Texas Radioactive Waste Dump Seeking Increased Capacity J at pm Filed Under: depleted uranium, Lon Burnam D-Fort Worth, Lubbock, Nuclear Power, Nuclear Waste, Radioactive.Targeting a largely Hispanic region in West Texas to store the nation’s most dangerous radioactive waste is an extreme example of environmental injustice.

The communities and counties along the radioactive waste highways should all have a say in our fate. Most Texans do not consent to being the nation’s radioactive waste dump.